Experience where Native Americans & early Europeans settlers came together in Texas

Over 100 years before there was San Augustine County, it was instead the site of a Spanish mission originally built in 1721! Listed in the National Register of Historic Places, a designated State Antiquities Landmark, and located on the El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail.

There is a museum with interpretive displays that showcases the history of Native Americans, Spanish explorers, and the French who once called this area home during the mission.

“The Spanish crown ended the mission experiments, what we describe it as,” said Amanda McVay, the Mission Dolores Site Manager. “Because of this, this property basically was left unchanged, and it became an archeological site.”

“The Spanish crown ended the mission experiments, what we describe it as, and called everybody back to San Antonio. Because of this, this property basically was left unchanged, and it became an archeological site.”

—  Amanda McVay, Mission Dolores Site Manager

While there are no above-ground remains left of the mission, it was abandoned in 1773, archeological digs throughout the last 5 decades has uncovered clues that showcase what everyday life may have been like during this timeframe.

Visitors can also enjoy time on the grounds through the campground or the picnic pavilions that are available. There are 32 overnight campsites that feature full hook-up back in sites. Plus, enjoy a walk through the trail (which is lit up during the holiday season in December!) for a relaxing time while experiencing this trip to the past.

To plan your visit or to learn about events going on at Mission Dolores, you can visit their website here or check out their Facebook page.


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Jade Allen

Jade Allen

Jade Allen explores East Texas to bring the most exciting activities and locations to The East Texas Weekend. Jade came to Texas in 2018, where it has steadily become a home and a place to explore.